Double success for IDL in the 2019 ARC Discovery Grants

25 June 2019

ARC

Every year, the Australian Research Council (ARC), the facilitators of the National Competitive Grants Program (NCGP), award funding to exceptional research projects, conducted by high-quality research groups or individuals, on behalf of the Australian Government. The Discovery Program is one of the funding projects developed by the ARC to ‘support excellent basic and applied research by individuals and teams’.

This year, two ARC Discovery Grants were successfully awarded to facilitate ground-breaking research projects, focusing on artificial intelligence and digital emotion regulation. These projects are to be led and explored by some of the Human-Computer Interaction group’s most experienced academic staff.

Funding from an ARC Discovery grant can be provided for up to five years consecutively, and will offer essential resources for the completion of two cutting-edge research projects:

Explanation in artificial intelligence: a human-centred approach

This research project will focus on developing improved methods for communicating the decision-making processes of artificial intelligence (AI) – in a way that is more conceptually “human-focused”. Drawing on research in Human-Computer Interaction, Computer Science and Cognitive Psychology, this project aims to facilitate new societal ways of conceiving AI, and perhaps help to alleviate some concerns around the future of AI technology.

  1. Professor Frank Vetere, School of Computing and Information Systems, The University of Melbourne
  2. Associate Professor Timothy Miller, School of Computing and Information Systems, The University of Melbourne
  3. Dr Eduardo Velloso, School of Computing and Information Systems, The University of Melbourne
  4. Associate Professor Piers Howe, Melbourne School of Psychological Services, The University of Melbourne
  5. Professor Elizabeth Sonenberg, School of Computing and Information Systems, The University of Melbourne
  6. Professor Paul Dourish, School of Computing and Information Systems, The University of Melbourne

Conceptualising and measuring digital emotion regulation

This project aims to further develop current understandings about appropriate technology use and, in particular, why people engage in digital emotion regulation. Through researching technological impacts on work, education, and interpersonal relationships, this study hopes to contribute to the debate around how people perceive and regulate their own use of technology, and treat those behaviours in others.

  1. Professor Vassilis Kostakos, School of Computing and Information Systems, The University of Melbourne
  2. Dr Greg Wadley, School of Computing and Information Systems, The University of Melbourne
  3. Dr Jorge Goncalves, School of Computing and Information Systems, The University of Melbourne
  4. Dr Wally Smith, School of Computing and Information Systems, The University of Melbourne
  5. Associate Professor Mario Alvarez-Jimenez, Centre for Youth Mental Health, The University of Melbourne
  6. Professor Anna Cox, UCL Interaction Centre, University College London
  7. Professor James Gross, Department of Psychology, Stanford University